DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Sat May 30, 2009 4:00 pm

Welcome to the world of Digital Photography.

First of, amature photrapher lang din po ako. I do not claim any expertise on the matter. Wink Pero ganun pa man din po, matagal na ako nag lalaro sa larangan ng photography. I started the hobby way back in HS when the digital world was not yet invented (opo, may edad na ako, though hindi pa naman senior citizen). That being said, I would like to share my experiences on the matter for the benefit of people who would like to get into the hobby but do not know where to start.

For those who are thinking of getting a digital camera, you SHOULD first ask yourself the following questions:

1) HOW SERIOUS ARE YOU ABOUT THE HOBBY?
2) DO YOU HAVE THE PATIENCE TO LEARN ABOUT SHUTTER SPEED, APPERTURES, ISO ETC?
3) HOW COMPLICATED DO YOU WANT YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY TO BE?

If your answers to the above questions are "I am just a simple guy who want to take good photos but do not like all the hassel of tingkering with all those buttons." , then get a simple point and shoot digital camera.

The only two brands I can suggest (only because I have used them and found them to be great) are the Sony Cybershot line and the Canon Powershot / Ixus line. You can not go wrong with any of these cameras. They are easy to manipulate and they are point-and-shoot. You need not worry about shutter speed or apperture openings.

The only things you need to consider when choosing from these cameras (or any similar camera of different brand) are the MegaPixels, digital zoom vs. optical zoom and whether it has the anti-shake feature.

For the benefit of those who do not know, the number of Pixels or MegaPixels (simply put) determines the maximum size of your photos and the clarity / detail. Ganito lang yan, kung mas madami o malaki ang pixels = mas malinaw ang litrato, mas malaki ang litrato, mas maganda kapag i bo-blow-up ninyo.

Sa zoom feature, I would suggest that you choose a camera that has an optical zoom, as opposed to a digital zoom. Why? For me, the quality of the image when magnified with an optical zoom remains crisp and clear. While it is grainy on a digital zoom. I will not try to hazard a technical explanation on the subject because hindi ako sigurado kung tama yung pagka intindi ko.

The anti-shake feature is a good feature kung meron ... but not really ganun ka importante. It just prevents your picture from blurring kung na nginig ang kamay mo (baka masyado ka kasi excited).

For an example of how a simple digital camera CAN and WILL take GOOD photos, take a look at the picture posted by Bros Thon and Xie below. Smile Clear, good details, good color, sharp!



Now if you think you are very serious about the hobby (photography), you have the patience to learn the intricacies of a Digital Single Lense Reflex (DSLR) camera, want to be able to control the and manipulate the outcome of your pictures .... then get a DSLR!


..... pagod na ako ... to be continued muna ha .... Razz


Last edited by Troy on Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:09 pm; edited 3 times in total (Reason for editing : Typos)

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Sat May 30, 2009 4:00 pm

2009 AutoShow







Last edited by Troy on Sat May 30, 2009 5:37 pm; edited 3 times in total

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Sat May 30, 2009 4:01 pm

Lianne



Last edited by Troy on Sat May 30, 2009 5:40 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by thonetteski on Sat May 30, 2009 4:58 pm


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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by F91 on Sat May 30, 2009 10:41 pm

tanong ko lang mga bossing - is it worth getting a 24-105 USM L or a 18-200mm canon?

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by thonetteski on Sun May 31, 2009 12:49 am

get the canon.... it's the most preferred brand by professional photo-journalists.....

yun photog ko yan ang gamot nya....



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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by matt boy on Sun May 31, 2009 1:33 am

bro kung may pera to burn ka go for a fast lens lagi ... yun ang mga lens with high aperture.... pero kasi nikon user ako so hindi ako sa lenses ng canon


F91 wrote:tanong ko lang mga bossing - is it worth getting a 24-105 USM L or a 18-200mm canon?

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Sun May 31, 2009 3:45 am

@ F91 - tignan mo kung ano ang needs mo. Priority mo ba ay yun zoom function or yun ability to shoot in low light conditions? If you need the zoom function more at daylaght shoots ka naman parati, then get the 18 - 200 IS USM (wow! tulo laway ko diyan!) If you think that you are going to need to shoot in low light conditions, then as Matt said, piliin mo yun may malaking aperture opening ... yun "F" number ang tignan mo. The lower the "F" ibig sabihin mas malaki ang aperture opening = mas maganda at mabilis maka focus sa low light!

Note that all the car show pictures I have posted and the same with the picture of Lianne, I did not use a flash. Mas natural kasi ang color if you use the light available sa room. This can be done only if you have a lense with a large aperture opening.

@ Manong Thon! Ang CUTEEEE naman niyannnnn! Pwede ba kunin pang pahotoshoot yan??? Clean photoshoot, promisssseeee! Very Happy Hahaha

@ Matt - kaw na mag bigay ng tips para NIKON sa thread na ito ha. Smile Canon user naman kasi ako e.


Last edited by Troy on Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:12 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Sun May 31, 2009 4:15 am

Transport Show 2009





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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by matt boy on Sun May 31, 2009 5:17 am

@bro tryo

nice environmental portraits heheheh... sali ka sa contest bro baka manalo ka heheheh....


nikon user ako pero not an expert din newbie rin ako eh. Pero willing mag turo sa fellow newbies din. Pero if you go for nikon and you have money to burn... go for the trinity lenses of nikon sakop mo na lahat ng focal lengths pero pricey. pero kung tight budget mo at ayaw mo mabawasan ang walks mo per month you can consider third party lenses din they cant surpasss the optics ng 1st arty lenses pero ok na rin for low light hehehe.. pero super tight budget ka get a 18-200 na lang and get a decent flash marami ka na magagawa dun....


@mang t
huhuhuh gusto ko siya Sad hehehe hangang tingin na lang ako diyan)

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by thonetteski on Sun May 31, 2009 3:51 pm


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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by xiexieall on Mon Jun 01, 2009 5:15 am

post ko din mga nikon shots ko at yung mga digi cam shots ko dito hehehe meron pala nito dito.

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SAMPLE KO MUNA ITO HEHEHE

Post by xiexieall on Mon Jun 01, 2009 5:18 am

ETO SHOT SA ISAN DIGICAM KO HEHEHE


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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by shutter_lens on Mon Jun 01, 2009 6:33 am

I'm into photography as well. I'll upload this one sample first, it could be boring. I'll try to upload from the car shows

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by matt boy on Mon Jun 01, 2009 7:32 am

huhuh wala ako mashare

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:25 pm

PART II DIGITAL SLRs

If you are sure you want the more complicated DSLRs, this is a VERY GOOD link to read through for basic information: Ben's Newbie Guide to Digital SLR Photography

Eto yun: Cut and Pasted, medyo edited ... without the example pictures. Go to the link at mas maganda may illustrated example. Wink


Ben's Newbie Guide to Digital SLR Photography

Part 1 - Aperture, Shutter Speed, & ISO

First and foremost, we need to cover the 3 main settings you should be adjusting on your Digital SLR and the relationship they share with one and other: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO. In the world of photography, light is everything. These 3 settings control how much light enters your camera or how your camera processes that light, so understanding what each setting controls and the relationship between the settings is critical to taking a properly exposed picture.

1) Aperture

Think of Aperture as the hole in your camera that lets in light. A bigger aperture means a bigger "hole" and thus, lets in more light. Conversely, a smaller aperture will let in less light. Aperture is probably the most confusing of the 3 settings because the number (f/stop) used to describe it may seem "backwards" to most people. The lower the number, the larger the aperture, and vise versa.

For example, an aperture of f/2.8 is twice as large as an aperture of f/4.0 and will let in twice as much light.

Aperture doesn't just control the light entering the camera, it also controls what is known as Depth of Field (DoF). This is the primary reason for adjusting the aperture value on the camera and is extremely important to understand. Depth of field is simply a way of describing how much of your picture is in focus. A narrow depth of field will have very little in focus (blurry background) while a wide depth of field will have almost the entire frame in focus (detailed background).

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting. A larger aperture (smaller number) will have a very narrow depth of field. A smaller aperture (larger number) will have a wide depth of field. For example, in the images above, the left picture was taken at f/10 where as the picture on the right was taken at f/2. A good way to remember this relationship is to think of the aperture f/stops (numbers) as a measurement of depth of field. The smaller the number, the smaller the depth of field, and vise versa.

So then, why would we ever want to use a large aperture (small number)? Wouldn't we always want the most detail possible? The short answer is no, because your aperture setting will vary greatly depending on your situation. If you're looking to isolate your subject or remove a distracting background, a narrow depth of field is the best way to do so. Your subject will be in focus and the background will be blurry. Depending on how far away the background is and how large your aperture is, the background can become so blurry that it almost looks milky. This magnitude of background blur is usually referred to as "bokeh" and is a desired effect for some pictures, especially portraits.

To recap:

A large aperture will let in more light, but will have a smaller (narrow) depth of field.
A small aperture will let in less light, but will have a larger (wide) depth of field.


2) Shutter Speed

Just like aperture, shutter speed controls how much light enters your camera. Think of the shutter as a door that usually remains closed. When taking a picture, this door opens momentarily and lets light in to the camera. The length of time the shutter stays open is called shutter speed. The slower the shutter speed, the longer the shutter stays open, and vise versa. When the shutter is open longer, more light enters the camera.

Aside from letting in light, your shutter speed is used to control motion; both subject motion AND your motion. No human being can ever stay perfectly still, so even with a motionless subject, your motion is equally as important to keep in mind.

The longer the shutter is open, the more motion blur will occur. Occasionally motion blur is preferable, but more often than not, accidental motion blur ruins what could have been a great picture. A good rule of thumb is to shoot a motionless subject at or above 1/focal lenth to avoid a blurry picture. For example, if you're using a 17-55mm lens at 50mm, it's best to shoot at 1/50 of a second or higher to avoid blur. Everyone is different and some people are steadier than others, so if you're particularly steady you may be able to lower the shutter speed a bit, or if you're particularly shaky you may need to increase the shutter speed a bit.

Shutter speed is most important when your subject is moving. For example, when shooting a moving car, if the shutter speed is too fast, it will look like the car is standing still. Too slow, and now the car is a giant blur. 1/160 is my preferred setting to catch a little motion blur in the background and to see the wheels spinning, but everyone is different.

To recap:

A slow shutter speed will let in more light, but will increase the chance of motion blur.
A fast shutter speed will let in less light, but will decrease the chance of motion blur.


3) ISO

ISO is similar to film speed on film cameras. Unlike aperture and shutter speed, ISO doesn't control how much light enters the camera, but instead controls how sensitive the camera is to that light. The lower the ISO, the less sensitive the camera is. In other words, a lower ISO will require more light to properly expose a picture than a higher ISO.

Most entry level digital SLR's will have an ISO range from 100 to 1600. More expensive digital SLR's may have ISO 50, 3200, and a select few have 6400. On most cameras, ISO is adjusted in full stops. Only the more expensive cameras will have 1/3 stop adjustments of ISO. In most cases you will be able to adjust your ISO to 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600. For example, ISO 100 will need twice as much light to expose the same picture as ISO 200.

So then, why not just max out the ISO and never worry about light ever again? Unfortunately, ISO comes at a price. Depending on your camera's ISO performance, it can come at a pretty hefty price too. As you increase ISO you are effectively decreasing the quality of your picture. While it's very hard to see a difference between ISO 100 and 200, ISO 800 or higher is extremely noticeable. On most cameras, taking a picture at ISO 1600 is completely worthless.

This is caused by the increased sensitivity of higher ISO settings. While increased sensitivity means you can expose a picture with less light, it also means your picture will have more noise (distortion). While a little noise can be acceptable -- especially if you'll be reducing the image size significantly for the web -- too much noise can completely trash a picture.

Here's an example of a picture taken at ISO 100 (left) and ISO 1600 (right):

To recap:

A lower ISO will produce a higher quality image but requires more light to expose a picture.
A higher ISO will produce a lower quality image but requires less light to expose a picture.


What it all means

As you can see, Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO are all closely related: they all control light in some way. Understanding how to balance the three is the key to properly exposing a picture. Like anything else, balancing the three settings is all about trade-offs. While it would be wonderful to take a picture with the fastest shutter speed, smallest aperture, and lowest ISO, it's just not possible.

Because of this, you need to evaluate what is most important for your given situation:

1) Shutter speed: Is the subject moving? Do you want to stop the action or do you want to see motion blur? If so, shutter speed is most important to you.

2) Aperture: Is the background distracting? Do you need to isolate your subject? Are you shooting a landscape? Do you need A LOT of detail? If so, aperture is most important to you.

Once you figure out what is most important, you can then play with the remaining settings to properly expose your shot.

If shutter speed is most important, set the shutter speed first. Next, select an acceptable aperture. With those settings, can the shot be properly exposed with ISO 100? ISO 200? If you need to bump your ISO to 400 or higher, you might re-evaluate your aperture in this case. Will you still be satisfied with this picture with less depth of field (a bigger aperture)? If so, you can open up your aperture to let in more light, allowing you to use a lower ISO.

If aperture is most important, set the aperture first. Do you need a lot of detail in your picture? Set a small (bigger number) aperture. Is your background distracting? Do you want to isolate your subject? Set a big (smaller number) aperture. Next, select an acceptable shutter speed. Just like in the previous example, can this shot be properly exposed with a low ISO? If not, can you reduce your shutter speed to let in more light? If your subject isn't moving and you have a steady hand, the answer would be yes. However, it's never a good idea to reduce your shutter speed to the point where you're risking taking a blurry picture. A little ISO noise is a lot better than a useless blurry picture, so play it safe.

Getting the hang of this balancing act can be tricky at first, but will eventually become second nature. Here's an example of how all 3 of the settings play off of each other:

You want to take a picture of a flower. Unfortunately, there's a dumpster behind this flower and it's not very attractive. In this situation,

Now, obviously this is an extreme example. As you get more experienced you won't go through this kind of scenario where you're adjusting your settings 4 or 5 times before finding the right exposure. You'll look at this situation and immediately know that the aperture should be around f/2.8, the shutter should be around 1/100, and ISO should be 200. Then you walk up, flick the shutter speed dial once or twice, and take the picture. The whole process takes less than 5 seconds.

I hope this guide has helped you understand Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO. If you found it helpful, please post a reply.


Part 2 - Focal Length, Zoom Range, and Crop-Factor

What exactly is focal length and what does it mean? More importantly, how does it affect you? Technically, focal length is the distance from the lens to the film (or in our case, the sensor). In more useful terms, focal length is how most people would describe "zoom." For example, a focal length of 100mm would appear to be twice as "zoomed in" as a 50mm focal length. While it is true that images appear to be 2x closer in a 100mm focal length vs a 50mm focal length, calling this "zoom" is actually incorrect.

So then, what is zoom? Before we can even answer that question, we have to first understand that there are two primary types of lenses for digital SLR's: Prime lenses and Zoom lenses. A prime lens has a single focal length (ex: 50mm). A zoom lens has a minimum focal length and a maximum focal length (ex: 17-55mm) and can use any focal length in between. A prime lens has no zoom at all, which is why referring to a particular focal length compared to another as "zoomed in" or "more zoomed" is incorrect. When comparing a 50mm and 100mm prime lens the proper term to describe the difference would be "reach." The 100mm lens has twice the reach of the 50mm.

When looking at the specifications for a Zoom lens you will probably see something like "Optical Zoom" or "Zoom." For example, you might see that a 17-55mm zoom lens has "3.2x" zoom. The proper term for this is actually "Zoom Range" and it simply means that the range between the minimum focal length (zoomed all the way out @ 17mm) and the maximum focal length (zoomed all the way in @ 55mm) is 3.2x. To figure out the "zoom" of any zoom lens, just divide the max focal length by the min focal length. 55 / 17 = 3.2.

Essentially, the word "zoom" is useless. It doesn't tell you anything about the "reach" of a lens which is what most people actually mean when they say the word "zoom." A good example of this would be to find the zoom ranges of these 2 lenses:

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 -- 55 divided by 17 is 3.2. Thus, this zoom lens has a zoom range of 3.2x.
Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 -- 200 divided by 70 is 2.9. Thus, this zoom lens has a zoom range of 2.9x.

Now, if normal people heard that the first lens had a zoom of "3.2x" and the second lens had a zoom of "2.9x" they'd probably assume that the first lens would let them see further away. However, we know this isn't actually the case because focal length is what determines the "reach" of the lens, the zoom is irrelevant.

In the same example above, the 70-200mm would actually have almost 4 times the reach of the 17-55mm. This is because 200mm is almost 4 times longer than 55mm.

The best way to understand focal length is to start with a base number that is most relevant to us: the focal length that looks most similar to our natural eye sight. On a full-frame camera (more on this later) 50mm is the closest focal length to our normal eye sight. In other words, if you were to look through a lens at 50mm it would appear as though nothing had changed. Reduce the focal length and things will appear further away. Increase the focal length and things will appear closer.

For example, 100mm will appear 2x closer than our normal eye sight. 200mm will appear 4x closer, and so on. On the flip side, 25mm will appear 2x further away, and 12mm will appear 4x further away. People often refer to lenses that are smaller than 35mm as "wide angle" lenses.


That's about it for focal length! When I have more time I'll write a part 3 to this guide which will discuss White Balance as well as RAW post-processing. Until then, good luck and happy shooting!

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Wed Jun 03, 2009 3:27 pm

Carmie




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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by matt boy on Wed Jun 03, 2009 3:43 pm

nice tips bro troy

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Wed Jun 03, 2009 4:07 pm

matt boy wrote:nice tips bro troy

Thank's Matt .. I labas mo na kasi mga photos mo ... personal consumption lang ba? Hahaha Very Happy

Regards bro.

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by thonetteski on Wed Jun 03, 2009 10:48 pm

be sure lang na artistic shots ah... no porno material and avoid postings of minors....


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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by F91 on Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:05 pm

boss troy, 50mm ba gamit nyo kay charmie?

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Thu Jun 04, 2009 2:42 am

thonetteski wrote:be sure lang na artistic shots ah... no porno material and avoid postings of minors....


Copy Manong Thon! Wink

Ganda ng colors ng photo na yan a! Vibrant!

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by Troy on Thu Jun 04, 2009 2:44 am

F91 wrote:boss troy, 50mm ba gamit nyo kay charmie?

Yes po. Canon 50mm f 1.4 USM Smile

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by matt boy on Thu Jun 04, 2009 2:58 am

nice shot bro

gusto ko yung shot na ito... it tells a story yung guy parang na stranded sa island at nagtext siya sa capitan ng barko nice.....( sana sa barko maraming chicks hehehehe)

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thonetteski wrote:be sure lang na artistic shots ah... no porno material and avoid postings of minors....


Copy Manong Thon! Wink

Ganda ng colors ng photo na yan a! Vibrant!

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Post by F91 on Thu Jun 04, 2009 11:26 am

parang commercial ng "tyak manawatan" ah...

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Re: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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